Elements of an Android App

Creating an app for Android doesn’t require a full-blown integrated development environment. There are several simple, easy-to-learn and easy-to-use tools that make programming Android apps a breeze. Michael Lehman introduces MIT App Inventor 2, Basic4android, and a few other entry-level development environments to build your own app. He’ll show how to test apps on an Android emulator or directly on your phone or tablet, and demonstrate tools for building hybrid apps that run on Android, Windows Phone, and iOS devices, as well as straight on the web. Start building your first app with these simple tools today. See more at: Simple Android Development Tools.

Topics include:

  • Understanding the elements of an Android app, such as controls, sensors, effectors, and storage
  • Exploring MIT App Inventor 2
  • Getting started with Basic4android
  • Building simple apps
  • Testing apps on Android emulators and devices
  • Sharing apps
  • Creating hybrid apps with Appy Pie, Make Me Droid, and AppMakr

App Inventor for Android

Android

Google App Inventor

App Inventor for Android is an open-source web application originally provided by Google, and now maintained by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

It allows newcomers to computer programming to create software applications for the Android operating system (OS). It uses a graphical interface, very similar to Scratch and the StarLogo TNG user interface, which allows users to drag-and-drop visual objects to create an application that can run on Android devices. In creating App Inventor, Google drew upon significant prior research in educational computing, as well as work done within Google on online development environments.

App Inventor and the projects on which it is based are informed by constructionist learning theories, which emphasizes that programming can be a vehicle for engaging powerful ideas through active learning. As such, it is part of an ongoing movement in computers and education that began with the work of Seymour Papert and the MIT Logo Group in the 1960s and has also manifested itself with Mitchel Resnick’s work on Lego Mindstorms and StarLogo.

App Inventor includes:

  • A designer, in which a program’s components are specified. This includes visible components, such as buttons and images, which are placed on a simulated screen, and non-visible components, such as sensors and web connections.
  • A blocks editor, in which the program’s logic is created.
  • A compiler based on the Kawa language framework and Kawa’s dialect of the Scheme programming language, developed by Per Bothner and distributed as part of the GNU operating system by the Free Software Foundation.
  • An app for real-time debugging on a connected Android device.

On December 6, 2013 (the start of the Hour of Code), MIT released App Inventor 2, renaming the original version “App Inventor Classic” Major differences are:

  • The blocks editor in the original version ran in a separate Java process, using the Open Blocks Java library for creating visual blocks programming languages.
    Open Blocks is distributed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Scheller Teacher Education Program (STEP) and is derived from master’s thesis research by Ricarose Roque. Professor Eric Klopfer and Daniel Wendel of the Scheller Program supported the distribution of Open Blocks under an MIT License. Open Blocks visual programming is closely related to StarLogo TNG, a project of STEP, and Scratch, a project of MIT Media Laboratory’s Lifelong Kindergarten Group. App Inventor 2 replaced Open Blocks with Blockly, a blocks editor that runs within the browser.
  • The | MIT AI2 Companion app enables real-time debugging on connected devices via Wi-Fi, not just USB.

As of May 2014, there were 87 thousand weekly active users of the service and 1.9 million registered users in 195 countries for a total of 4.7 million apps built.

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Web Technology Tutorial: Front-end Design

Get an overview of front-end site development in this tutorial, including common development languages, design processes, and more. Watch more at: Web Technology Fundamentals.

This tutorial is a single movie from the Web Technology Fundamentals course by lynda.com author James Williamson. The complete course is 2 hours and 4 minutes and shows how a “plain English” guide to the technology and the terminology behind the web.

Introduction
1. Introduction to the Web
2. Front-End Technology
3. Back-End Technology
4. Assembly Technologies

Front-end Development

front-endFront end development is the development of those elements of a website that the customers sees and interacts with directly. It is a combination programming skills (knowing which program to choose) and aesthetics (understanding element arrangements on the screen, the color and font choices). The challenges associated with front end developers is that the tools and techniques used to create the front end of a website change constantly and so the developer needs to constantly be aware of how the field is developing.

The objective of designing a site is to ensure that when the users opens up the site they see the information in a format thats easy to read and relevant. This is further complicated by the fact that users now use a large variety of devices with varying screen sizes and resolutions thus forcing the designer to take into consideration these aspects when designing the site. They need to ensure that their site comes up correctly in different browsers (cross-browser), different operating systems (cross-platform) and different devices (cross-device), which needs careful planning on the site of the developer.

Front and Back-ends

The front end is responsible for collecting input in various forms from the user and processing it to conform to a specification the back end can use. The front end is an interface between the user and the back end. The front and back ends may be distributed amongst one or more systems.

In software design, for example, the model-view-controller architecture, provides front and back ends for the database, the user, and the data processing components. The separation of software systems into front and back ends simplifies development and separates maintenance. A rule of thumb is that the front (or “client”) side is any component manipulated by the user. The server-side (or “back end”) code resides on the server. The confusion arises when one must make front-end edits to server-side files. Most HTML designers, for instance, don’t need to be on the server when they are developing the HTML; conversely, the server-side engineers are, by definition, never on anything but a server. It takes both to ultimately make a functioning, interactive website.

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Squarespace: Add a Gallery Page

Squarespace is a web-publishing platform for everyone, and its popularity proves it’s here to stay. In this course, Brian Wood gets you up and running with Squarespace and on the road to building your very own website. Along the way, he will show you how to add the advanced features that attract visitors to modern sites, like image galleries, blogs, maps, and social media integration. Dive in and start concentrating on developing your content, not your code, with Squarespace. Watch more here: Up and Running with Squarespace.

Topics include:

  • What is Squarespace?
  • Changing templates
  • Editing styling
  • Arranging blocks of content
  • Working with text and images
  • Inserting video
  • Adding a blog and an image gallery
  • Creating your own domain

SquarespaceSquarespace is a great platform for people that do not know how to code websites, or they simply are not interested in learning. The user interface is intuitive and user friendly. Many small businesses and entreprenuers don’t have the time to design and develop a website for their business, but they want to have control over their content.

Latest Version

Completely new system featuring a more free form and flexible layout system. Added portfolio templates, responsive designs which work well on mobile devices. It is great that this version added a true developer platform allowing full control of all HTML, CSS and Javascript files. The commerce portion added ShipStation order integration, Xero accounting support, and Stripe payment processing.

Software as a Service (SaaS)

Squarespace is a SaaS-based content management system (CMS) which is composed of a website builder, blogging platform and hosting service. The service allows individuals and businesses to create and maintain websites and blogs. One of the biggest selling points for these companies is the potential to reduce IT support costs by outsourcing hardware and software maintenance and support to the SaaS provider. The Cloud (or SaaS) model has no physical need for indirect distribution since it is not distributed physically and is deployed almost instantaneously.

Some Examples of Drag and Drop

A common example is dragging an icon on a virtual desktop to a special trashcan icon to delete a file.

Further examples include:

  • Dragging a data file onto a program icon or window for viewing or processing. For instance, dropping an icon that represents a text file into a Microsoft Word window signifies “Open this document as a new document in Word”
  • Moving or copying files to a new location/directory/folder,
  • Adding objects to a list of objects to be processed,
  • Rearranging widgets in a graphical user interface to customize their layout,
  • Dragging an attribute onto an object to which the command is to be applied,
    • e.g. dragging a color onto a graphical object to change its color,
  • Dragging a tool to a canvas location to apply the tool at that location,
  • Creating a hyperlink from one location or word to another location or document.
  • Most word processors allow dragging selected text from one point to another.
  • Dragging a series of codeblocks such as in Blender for designing shaders and materials.

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Exploring Our Workflow with Gulp.js, Git, and Browserify

Modern front-end development means more than just writing HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Developing an efficient workflow will help you write better code and test and deploy your web applications easily and efficiently. Staff author Ray Villalobos is here to show you how to generate a workflow that makes it easier to build websites with processed languages like Sass, Compass, and CoffeeScript. He’ll show how to automate development and production versions of your sites, track and share project files with Git and GitHub, and add libraries like jQuery and Mustache.js with Browserify. All of these techniques should easily translate to building your own web projects. Watch more at: Web Project Workflows with Gulp.js, Git, and Browserify.

Topics include:

  • Why workflow management?
  • Processing tasks with gulp-coffee
  • Importing libraries with Browserify
  • Processing Sass and Compass
  • Issuing tasks in sequence
  • Watching changes to files
  • Adding static reloads
  • Setting up environment variables
  • Minifying HTML
  • Compressing images

JavaScript templating

Templating workflowJavaScript templating refers to the client side data binding method implemented with the JavaScript language. This approach became popular thanks to JavaScript’s increased use, its increase in client processing capabilities, and the trend to outsource calculus to the client’s web browser. Popular JavaScript templating libraries are Angular.js, Backbone.js, Ember.js, Handlebars.js, and Mustache.js. A frequent practice is to use double curly brackets (i.e. {{key}}) to call values of the given key from data files, often JSON objects.

Mustache (template system)

Mustache is a simple web template system with implementations available for ActionScript, C++, Clojure, CoffeeScript, ColdFusion, D, Delphi, Erlang, Fantom, Go, Java, JavaScript, Lua, .NET, Objective-C, Pharo, Perl, PHP, Python, Ruby, Scala and XQuery.

Mustache is described as a “logic-less” system because it lacks any explicit control flow statements, like if and else conditionals or for loops; however, both looping and conditional evaluation can be achieved using section tags processing lists and lambdas.

It is named “Mustache” because of heavy use of curly braces that resemble a mustache. See Mustache syntax.

Mustache is used mainly for mobile and web applications.

Examples

The simplest template:

Hello {{name}}

Template with section tag:

{{#x}}
some text
{{/x}}

CoffeeScript

CoffeeScript is a programming language that transcompiles to JavaScript. It adds syntactic sugar inspired by Ruby, Python and Haskell to enhance JavaScript’s brevity and readability. Specific additional features include list comprehension and pattern matching. CoffeeScript compiles predictably to JavaScript, and programs can be written with less code, typically 1/3 fewer lines, with no effect on runtime performance. In 2013 it was also ranked 29th among languages, based on number of questions tagged at Stack Overflow.

The language has a relatively large following in the Ruby community. CoffeeScript support is included in Ruby on Rails version 3.1. In 2011, Brendan Eich referenced CoffeeScript as an influence on his thoughts about the future of JavaScript.

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What Are Adaptive Views? UX Design Tools: Axure

Brian Thurston Bralczyk introduces Axure’s ready-made widgets, functioning form elements, and dynamic content that can be hidden, moved around the page, or even animated. Plus, learn how to generate flows and sitemaps, and create adaptive web designs to view your project on a range of devices. Watch the online video course: UX Design Tools: Axure with Brian Thurston Bralczyk.

Topics include:

  • Using and styling widgets
  • Setting up interactions
  • Creating hide/show options for content
  • Creating an accordion menu
  • Applying web fonts
  • Using flow widgets
  • Creating and placing masters
  • Styling pages
  • Adding form fields with widgets
  • Building a slideshow with dynamic panels
  • Setting up adaptive views

Axure RP

adaptive designAxure RP Pro is a wireframing, rapid prototyping, and specification software tool aimed at web and desktop applications. It offers capabilities typically found in diagramming tools like drag and drop placement, resizing, and formatting of widgets. In addition, it has features for annotating widgets and defining interactions such as linking, conditional linking, simulating tab controls, show/hide element etc. There is support for medium-fidelity simulation of Rich Internet Applications. Axure RP can then generate HTML prototypes and Microsoft Word specifications from the diagrams.

The Axure RP Pro application window is divided into 6 main areas:

  • sitemap – a hierarchical list of pages
  • widgets
  • masters (templates, or reusable collections of widgets)
  • page area – the main design area
  • page notes and interactions
  • widget annotations and interactions

Widgets available include:

  • wireframe: image, text panel, hyperlink, rectangle, table, line (horizontal/vertical), menu (horizontal/vertical), tree
  • form controls: button (various shapes, including tab buttons), text field, text area, drop-down list, list box, checkbox, radio button, image map region
  • placeholder, inline frame, dynamic panel (used to achieve interactivity)

Other widgets can be simulated by combining existing widgets and assigning specific actions to events such as OnClick, OnMouseOver and OnMouseOut. For example, dynamic panels can have a number of states, each state being activated by clicking on an element such as a tab button, list-box item, or action button. For tabs, this allows constructing a tab control.

Adaptive web design

Adaptive web design is basically the same as responsive design and shares many of the same ideals and goals. The main difference however is that the changes are made on the server side rather than the client side.

Adaptive websites are designed to respond and adapt to different screen sizes using responsive techniques, and to adapt to different User requirements based on different device capabilities.

The responsive design aspect of adaptive design involves the implementation of various design factors such as flexible layouts, CSS file alternatives and flexible images, which are activated using media queries.

With adaptive delivery, the most significant difference is that the server hosting the website detects the devices making requests to it, and uses this information to deliver different batches of HTML and CSS code based on the characteristics of the device that have been detected. See: Responsive design vs. adaptive delivery: Which one’s right for you?

Adaptive web design also encompasses a range of other strategies which, when combined with responsive design techniques, enables you to deliver the best possible User experience to the widest possible audience. This means that numerous functionalities and environmental factors can be catered for in the most User friendly way, depending on the particular device being used to access your website.

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Up and Running with PhoneGap Build – Building from the Command-line Interface

See how PhoneGap, an open-source framework, and PhoneGap Build, a service in the Adobe Creative Cloud, allow you to create cross-platform mobile apps using the web technologies you know and love: HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. This course explores how to use PhoneGap Build to create app-store-ready applications for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone. Learn how to build an app from GitHub, Dreamweaver, Edge Code, or even a simple ZIP file; configure icons, splash screens, and other preferences; enable access to camera and location sensor data; and deploy and install your device on your smart phone or tablet. Watch the lynda.com online course: Up and Running with PhoneGap Build

Topics include:

  • Creating a PhoneGap Build account
  • Exploring the HTML structure of an app
  • Configuring your mobile device for development
  • Building from Dreamweaver, Edge Code, or the command line
  • Setting up a config.xml file
  • Setting parameters and permissions
  • Deploying on iOS or Android

Application command-line interfaces

Application programs (as opposed to operating systems) may also have command line interfaces.

command-line

Screenshot of a sample Bash session. GNOME Terminal 3, Fedora 15

An application program may support none, any, or all of these three major types of command line interface mechanisms:

  1. Parameters: Most operating systems support a means to pass additional information to a program when it is launched. When a program is launched from an OS command-line shell, additional text provided along with the program name is passed to the launched program.
  2. Interactive command-line sessions: After launch, a program may provide an operator with an independent means to enter commands in the form of text.
  3. OS inter-process communication: Most operating systems support means of inter-process communication (for example; standard streams or named pipes). Command lines from client processes may be redirected to a CLI program by one of these methods.

CLI software
Some applications support only a CLI, presenting a CLI prompt to the user and acting upon command-lines as they are entered. Some examples of CLI-only applications are:

  • DEBUG
  • Diskpart
  • Ed
  • Edlin
  • Fdisk
  • Ping

Hybrid software

Some computer programs support both a CLI and a GUI. In some cases, a GUI is simply a wrapper around a separate CLI executable file. In other cases, a program may provide a CLI as an optional alternative to its GUI. Both interfaces do not always offer similar functionality. For example, MATLAB, a numerical analysis computer program, provides no GUI for some calculations, but the CLI can handle any calculation MATLAB supports.

Here’s an excellent post on command-line tooling:

Command Line Tools for Frontend Developers

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Packaging an Android app

In this course, lynda.com author David Gassner shows you how to prepare, package, and publish your Android app on Google Play, and provides a brief overview of the alternatives offered by Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Watch the online video course: Distributing Android Apps

Topics include:

  • Packaging an Android app
  • Distributing through Google vs. Amazon vs. Barnes & Noble
  • Exporting the APK file
  • Testing the app
  • Shrinking and protecting an app with ProGuard
  • Creating and uploading screenshots to Google Play
  • Adding in-app products
  • Tracking app usage and revenue

Android Apps

Android

Android 4.4.2 home screen

Android has a growing selection of third party applications, which can be acquired by users either through an app store such as Google Play or the Amazon Appstore, or by downloading and installing the application’s APK file from a third-party site. The Play Store application allows users to browse, download and update apps published by Google and third-party developers, and is pre-installed on devices that comply with Google’s compatibility requirements. The app filters the list of available applications to those that are compatible with the user’s device, and developers may restrict their applications to particular carriers or countries for business reasons. Purchases of unwanted applications can be refunded within 15 minutes of the time of download, and some carriers offer direct carrier billing for Google Play application purchases, where the cost of the application is added to the user’s monthly bill.

As of July 2013, there are more than one million applications available for Android in the Play Store. As of May 2013, 48 billion apps have been installed from the Google Play store.

Applications (“apps”), that extend the functionality of devices, are developed primarily in the Java programming language language using the Android software development kit (SDK). The SDK includes a comprehensive set of development tools, including a debugger, software libraries, a handset emulator based on QEMU, documentation, sample code, and tutorials. The officially supported integrated development environment (IDE) is Eclipse using the Android Development Tools (ADT) plugin. Other development tools are available, including a Native Development Kit for applications or extensions in C or C++, Google App Inventor, a visual environment for novice programmers, and various cross platform mobile web applications frameworks.

It was announced in January 2014 that Chrome HTML5 web applications should become available, using a compatibility layer from the open source Apache Cordova framework to allow such applications to be wrapped in a native application shell, enabling their distribution over Google Play.

In order to work around limitations on reaching Google services due to Internet censorship in the People’s Republic of China, Android devices sold in the PRC are generally customized to use state approved services instead.


Learn to Build a Simple Android App Interactive Video Learning Path

from: Treehouse

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How to Setup Your E-mail Account in iOS 7

Learn how to setup your email account on your iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch running iOS 7. Learn more about BlueHost, the world’s largest providers of cloud-based online solutions.

CLICK HERE TO SIGNUP FOR BLUEHOST.COM

E-Mail protocols

e-mailThe Internet Message Access Protocol (commonly known as IMAP) is an Application Layer Internet protocol that allows an e-mail client to access e-mail on a remote mail server. The current version, IMAP version 4 revision 1 (IMAP4), is defined by RFC 3501. An IMAP server typically listens on well-known port 143. IMAP over SSL (IMAPS) is assigned well-known port number 993.

IMAP supports both on-line and off-line modes of operation. E-mail clients using IMAP generally leave messages on the server until the user explicitly deletes them. This and other characteristics of IMAP operation allow multiple clients to manage the same mailbox. Most e-mail clients support IMAP in addition to Post Office Protocol (POP) to retrieve messages; however, fewer e-mail services support IMAP. IMAP offers access to the mail storage. Clients may store local copies of the messages, but these are considered to be a temporary cache.

Incoming e-mail messages are sent to an e-mail server that stores messages in the recipient’s e-mail box. The user retrieves the messages with an e-mail client that uses one of a number of e-mail retrieval protocols. Some clients and servers preferentially use vendor-specific, proprietary protocols, but most support SMTP for sending e-mail and POP and IMAP for retrieving e-mail, allowing interoperability with other servers and clients. For example, Microsoft’s Outlook client uses MAPI, a Microsoft proprietary protocol to communicate with a Microsoft Exchange Server. IBM’s Notes client works in a similar fashion when communicating with a Domino server. All of these products also support POP, IMAP, and outgoing SMTP. Support for the Internet standard protocols allows many e-mail clients such as Pegasus Mail or Mozilla Thunderbird to access these servers, and allows the clients to be used with other servers.

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WordPress Tutorial: What’s New in WordPress 3.8

WordPress 3.8

WordPress 3.8WordPress 3.8 is here and there are a lot of exciting changes. Get up to date with the new features and start enhancing your blog or website today. In this video, lynda.com author Morten Rand-Hendriksen reveals the redesigned dashboard, which is high contrast, clean, and more customizable than ever, and the new Twenty Fourteen theme, which provides a (highly requested) featured content area on your front page. The new dashboard is also fully responsive, so you can now visit the dashboard from your mobile device. This is great for making changes on the go!

Magazine Theme

The magazine theme is a page layout for WordPress (a “theme”) that mimics the layout of a newspaper or magazine, with multiple boxes and spaces for photographs, allowing for certain posts to be called out.

Look and feel

In software design, look and feel is a term used in respect of a graphical user interface and comprises aspects of its design, including elements such as colors, shapes, layout, and typefaces (the “look”), as well as the behavior of dynamic elements such as buttons, boxes, and menus (the “feel”). The term can also refer to aspects of an API, mostly to parts of an API that are not related to its functional properties. The term is used in reference to both software and websites.

Look and feel applies to other products. In documentation, for example, it refers to the graphical layout (document size, color, font, etc.) and the writing style. In the context of equipment, it refers to consistency in controls and displays across a product line.

Look and feel in operating system user interfaces serves two general purposes. First, it provides branding, helping to identify a set of products from one company. Second, it increases ease of use, since users will become familiar with how one product functions (looks, reads, etc.) and can translate their experience to other products with the same look and feel.

Some Popular WordPress Magazine Themes From ThemeForest:

PRESSO – Clean & Modern Magazine Theme
Mogoze – Responsive Magazine WordPress Theme
Orion Press – Retina and Responsive Magazine Theme

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Responsive HTML Emails, JavaScript Techniques, WebGL

You can find more useful learning videos similar to this one (this video is awesome!) at: http://teamtreehouse.com – Learn to make websites, mobile apps, and more!

In this episode of The Treehouse Show, Nick Pettit (@nickrp) and Jason Seifer (@jseifer) talk about the latest in web design, web development, html5, front end development, and more.

WebGL Design

Responsive WebGLWebGL is based on OpenGL ES 2.0 and provides an API for 3D graphics. It uses the HTML5 canvas element and is accessed using Document Object Model interfaces. Automatic memory management is provided as part of the JavaScript language.

Like OpenGL ES 2.0, WebGL does not have the fixed-function APIs introduced in OpenGL 1.0 and deprecated in OpenGL 3.0. This functionality can instead be provided by the user in the JavaScript code space.

Mobile Browsers

  • Android Browser – Supported in its replacement Google Chrome that is now standard Android browser, but basically unsupported before, but the Sony Ericsson Xperia range of Android smartphones have had WebGL capabilities following a firmware upgrade. Samsung smartphones also have WebGL enabled (verified on Galaxy SII (4.1.2) and Galaxy Note 8.0 (4.2))
  • BlackBerry PlayBook – WebGL is available via WebWorks and browser in PlayBook OS 2.00
  • Firefox for mobile – WebGL is available for Android devices since Firefox 4.
  • Firefox OS
  • Google Chrome – WebGL is available for Android devices since Google Chrome 25 and enabled by default since version 30.
  • Maemo – In Nokia N900, WebGL is available in the stock microB browser from the PR1.2 firmware update onwards.
  • Opera Mobile – Opera Mobile 12 supports WebGL (on Android only).
  • Tizen 1.0
  • Ubuntu Touch
  • WebOS
  • iOS – Officially only available through iAd on iOS 4.2 and higher, for all devices except for 2nd Gen iPod Touch or iPhone 3G and earlier. However, there is a tweak for jailbroken devices to enable functionality for Mobile Safari and all other WebKit browsers.

However its availability is dependent on other factors like the GPU supporting it. To check if a determined device supports WebGL, anyone could go to: Your browser supports WebGL.

Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web design (RWD) is a Web design approach aimed at crafting sites to provide an optimal viewing experience—easy reading and navigation with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling—across a wide range of devices (from mobile phones to desktop computer monitors).

A site designed with RWD adapts the layout to the viewing environment by using fluid, proportion-based grids, flexible images, and CSS3 media queries, an extension of the @media rule.

  • The fluid grid concept calls for page element sizing to be in relative units like percentages, rather than absolute units like pixels or points.
  • Flexible images are also sized in relative units, so as to prevent them from displaying outside their containing element.
  • Media queries allow the page to use different CSS style rules based on characteristics of the device the site is being displayed on, most commonly the width of the browser.
  • Server-side components (RESS) in conjunction with client-side ones such as media queries can produce faster-loading sites for access over cellular networks and also deliver richer functionality/usability avoiding some of the pitfalls of device-side-only solutions.

A related concept…

Audience and Device Aware (ADA)
Audience and Device Aware is an approach aimed at ensuring that a site is optimized to deliver what a user wants and that works effectively on the device being used to access the site. Unlike Responsive web design (RWD), which crafts a site visually for a range of devices, ADA aims to reflect the many different elements that enhance and impact on the performance and usability of a site. The predominant application for the ADA approach is for mobile and smaller screen devices. The principle truly sees the adoption of a “mobile first” strategy and focuses on the performance of a site and value that it delivers to a user and the business.

Here are the links from the video:
Responsive HTML Emails: a Different Strategy – Fog Creek Blog
http://blog.fogcreek.com/responsive-h…

Frequently Misunderstood JavaScript Concepts
http://bolinfest.com/javascript/misun…

Building an amazing fullscreen mobile experience – HTML5 Rocks
http://www.html5rocks.com/en/mobile/f…

Creditcard.js
http://creditcardjs.com/

WebGL Shaders with Firefox Developer Tools
http://hacks.mozilla.org/2013/11/live…

getify/You-Dont-Know-JS
http://github.com/getify/You-Dont-Kno…

Techniques for Responsive Typography | Codrops
http://tympanus.net/codrops/2013/11/1…

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